General Patton’s entry into the town of Many, Louisiana

St. John’s Catholic Church of Many, La. as it looked during the Louisiana Maneuvers of 1941. (State Library of Louisiana(http://www.state.lib.la.us)
St. John’s Catholic Church of Many, La. as it looked during the Louisiana Maneuvers of 1941. (State Library of Louisiana(http://www.state.lib.la.us)

​​​By Rickey Robertson

(Editor’s note:  Thanks so much to Mr. Robertson for sharing this article with us.  He is a man filled with knowledge on the World War II Maneuvers in Louisiana, and is a passionate historian of military-related items and happenings as well as history of the region he calls home (including Sabine and Vernon Parishes).

​Possibly the greatest fighting general in the history of the United States Army was General George S. Patton Jr. General Patton pushed both himself and his men during the Louisiana Maneuvers of 1941 tirelessly because he could see that America was being pushed into the war that was raging in Europe. Patton had been a mounted cavalry officer most of his career, and when he was chosen to become the commander of the 2nd Armored Division, many of the old mounted cavalry tactics that he had been taught he was able to use and perfect with his fast mechanized units.

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