Tom Sawyer Chapel: Once upon a time in a Sabine Parish forest

 

Once upon a time in a place not so far away and a time not so long ago, there stood an idyllic vessel of worship high on a hilltop in a real life forest which skirted the shoreline of a magnificent body of water

Continue reading “Tom Sawyer Chapel: Once upon a time in a Sabine Parish forest”

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Story of Noble, Louisiana brilliant recluse takes me by storm and leaves me reeling

Sometimes, the crazy old man in the town you were raised in… wasn’t.

That very sentence hooked me and reeled me in to one of the better non-fiction books I have ever read.
 
“Smokey” is a book about a local character who plenty of locals seemed to have been aware of but who no one really knew.  Herbert Glen Irwin lived 32 years of his unique and what could easily be called incredible 84 years of life in the tiny community of Noble, Louisiana, located in northern Sabine Parish.

Continue reading “Story of Noble, Louisiana brilliant recluse takes me by storm and leaves me reeling”

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Fun detour to Anacoco Lake Spillway… plus lessons in history and challenges to explore more

For many years, the most I knew about Anacoco Lake was that I thought could see it on the west side of U.S. Hwy. 171 during my many travels between Sabine Parish, Louisiana to Lake Charles, Louisiana.  I saw it as a scenic lake which appeared to reach many different levels… sometimes it was lush and high, other times it was low with plenty of exposed trees.  Much like a miniature version of Toledo Bend Lake. Continue reading “Fun detour to Anacoco Lake Spillway… plus lessons in history and challenges to explore more”

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The story of a film star: Full of twists and turns from Toro, Louisiana to Hollywood, California

ats mary miles minter
I have been aware for many years of a silent film star whose roots are in Sabine Parish.  I remembered reading several years ago about Mary Miles Minter and her connections to this parish.  I recalled reading she was buried in a cemetery in Mansfield, Louisiana.  I knew she was the subject of scandalous accusations following the Hollywood true crime story of the murder of Paramount Studios Director William Desmond Taylor.  I knew she retreated into private life and the depths of solitude after having her squeaky clean image tarnished at the hands of tabloid media (who by all counts might have been bigger vultures a hundred years ago than they are today). Continue reading “The story of a film star: Full of twists and turns from Toro, Louisiana to Hollywood, California”

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A wooden train car; a bit of ignorance; shrugging Atlas; and stories to be told

kirbytrain

A good photograph  can say a thousand words.

“Wooden passenger car the day the lots were sold,” is written on the back of this photograph, supposedly the first excursion train in Kirbyville, Texas.

Continue reading “A wooden train car; a bit of ignorance; shrugging Atlas; and stories to be told”

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Events of the Evening

Time lapse segment on Toledo Bend Lake, on a nice December evening of 2015.  Captured straight consecutive exposures for about an hour and a half, but could not use almost the entire last half of the exposures because my lens had completely fogged up due to high humidity in the area and a wildfire a few miles away.

My camera was set up at the foot of the Pendleton Bridge, on the Louisiana side, looking towards Texas.

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Saving the Past; Enriching the Future

Tucked away just a tiny distance from the historic community of Keatchie, Louisiana (DeSoto Parish) is a National Treasure. Literally.

Quite literally, in fact. A vestige of an era gone by.

I’ve been through Keatchie many times. It is a small community along a winding, often scenic two-lane road which leads from Logansport, Louisiana to U.S. Hwy. 171 just south of Shreveport.

I’ve seen this National Treasure many times before. But until just a few days ago, I’ve never quite taken the time to appreciate this treasure… what it is, what it was, what it means or what it meant, or to even realize that it is, in fact, a National Treasure. This is one of the many reasons I love producing “All Things Sabine”… it gives me a reason (or perhaps, equally stated, an excuse) to stop the car, turn around and take a closer look at sites. Continue reading “Saving the Past; Enriching the Future”

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The ever-elusive “quickie” detour to Toro Bayou

Toro Bayou, aka Toro Creek, is one of my favorite places to chill and enjoy nature at its finest.  The bayou, or creek as most locals call it, meanders, twists, bends and curves quite a bit between Sabine and Vernon Parishes in West Central Louisiana.

On our way to Southeast Texas yesterday, the girls and I stopped at Toro for what I planned to be a quickie look at the level of water on the bayou.  I was curious as to whether the flooding along the Sabine and massive managed releases of water from Toledo Bend were affecting the bayou’s level.  As has pretty much always been the case with any “quickie” stop to look at Toro, the stop turned into a good, long, happy visit.

More often than not through the years, I have found Toro’s level to be on the low side.  I have canoed it countless times and we usually end up pushing our canoes a small but still mention-able percent of the six mile or so trip.  Yesterday, the bayou was high.  Not extremely high, just high.  I tried to think of whether I’ve seen it higher, and my guess would be that this was “as high” as I had seen the creek but not necessarily “higher than”.  Mostly I had seen it lower… so it was quite breathtaking to see it at the level it was yesterday and in all its glory.

We sat on a white sandy beach on Toro, enjoying nature at its finest.  Other than the sounds of the occasionally very distant aircraft and more frequent very close gun fire, it truly felt as though we had stepped back in time… more than a hundred years ago when one could clearly hear each and every one of the the songs and calls of several different species of birds, the quiet rustling of critters in the woods, and the relaxing flow of water as it made its way downstream towards the Sabine River.

We reluctantly determined we had to end our quickie detour of Toro when we realized it was nearly 1 p.m.  We had planned to be far closer to Beaumont by this time… umm, well actually, maybe in Beaumont by this time.  Beaumont was another two hours away.  Oops.

Did I mention I love Toro?

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The Spirit of Christmas on the Sabine River, in Logansport, Louisiana

Video footage taken on two fantastic evenings along the Sabine River in the Village of Logansport, Louisiana.  The village and its residents join together each Christmas season to bring a brilliant display to residents of the area and visitors to the area.

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